Ageing Better research improving housing for old people

A new study of over 2,000 adults aged 40-60 has researched people’s thoughts relating to ageing and later life and revealed worries over health, age discrimination and financial security.

The new poll, commissioned by Independent Age and the Centre for Ageing Better and carried out by YouGov, coincides with the launch of a landmark consensus statement signed by almost 70 prominent organisations to transform England into the best country in the world to grow older.

The survey revealed physical health over 65 was a principal worry for many, with 65 percent concerned how their physical health will affect their ability to be as financially secure as they would like, 55 percent apprehensive about being able to be as physically active as they want, and 43 percent anxious about being able to live in the kind of home they want.

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When asked about what could affect people’s physical health over the age of 65, two in three (67 percent) said ageism or being treated differently based on age negatively can affect the physical health of over-65s.

Considering what will be most important to them when they are over 65, 81 percent noted having good mental health whilst 72 percent considered physical health as very important. 74 percent also listed being financially secure and 60 percent stated being able to see family and friends face-to-face as very important.

Ageing Better research physical health concerns

Highlighting what should be prioritised in the UK to ensure people over-65 have a good quality of life, a majority of 69 percent of adults said improving homes to meet the needs of older people, by providing home adaptations at reduced costs for example, should be a key concern.

In addition, 68 percent said improving neighbourhoods for older people by providing means such as more public transport options which are accessible for disabled people should also be a priority.

Other priorities included eliminating age discrimination (63 percent) and supporting people to stay in work for as long as they want (58 percent).

Ageing Better research ageism and physical health concerns

Phil Mawhinney, Policy Manager at Independent Age, said: “As we grow older, we all want to live life on our own terms, and this research has found that most people aged 40-60 think having good physical and mental health will be very important when they are older.

“While it’s no surprise that people value being financially secure, able to live independently at home and see friends and family, with more people living longer, it’s vital that we do more to tackle ageism, poor health, poverty and loneliness among people in later life.”

Aiming to tackle the negative issues and stigmas related to ageing, almost 70 leading public and voluntary sector organisations have signed up to the new consensus statement for ageing better, endorsing five key principles around prioritising prevention, narrowing inequalities and fostering inclusive homes, workplaces and communities.

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https://i2.wp.com/thiis.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Ageing-Better-research-improving-housing-for-old-people.jpg?fit=1000%2C562&ssl=1https://i2.wp.com/thiis.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Ageing-Better-research-improving-housing-for-old-people.jpg?resize=150%2C150&ssl=1Calvin BarnettNewsroomReports & ResearchThird Sectorageing concerns,Centre for Ageing Better,Consensus Statement,growing older,healthy ageing,home adaptations,Independent Age,studyA new study of over 2,000 adults aged 40-60 has researched people’s thoughts relating to ageing and later life and revealed worries over health, age discrimination and financial security. The new poll, commissioned by Independent Age and the Centre for Ageing Better and carried out by YouGov, coincides with the...News, views & products for mobility, access and independent living professionals