Legoland Windsor
Legoland Windsor has agreed to review its policies after a young boy from was forced to get out of his wheelchair and walk before being allowed on a ride.

Seven-year-old Sebby Brett from Gloucestershire has an undiagnosed gross motor delay, similar to cerebral palsy, which has left him unable to walk short distances without assistance.

Sebby’s mum Joanna Brett took him to the Legoland Windsor resort last September. The visit was a treat for her son after he had undergone four operations in 12 months.

The family, however, said that they felt humiliated when staff forced Sebby to walk. Sebby had hoped to have a go on his favourite ride – The Ninjango – but before being allowed on the ride, he was forced to get out of his wheelchair and take three steps.

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Despite booking a disabled pass, Mrs Brett said staff at the park had not made her aware there would be any accessibility issues. She has since pushed for a change to have more inclusive evacuation rules.

The incident led to an intervention by Stroud MP Siobhan Baillie in Parliament and a 28,000-signature petition for better disabled access to leisure attractions.

Legoland Windsor has now agreed to amend its evacuation policies for three rides with immediate effect.

As well as the evacuation polices, changes will be implemented from March 2021 for a further seven rides, removing the requirement for disabled guests to walk 10 metres or up steps.

A Legoland spokesperson told the BBC: “We are already in the process of reviewing our staff training and how we communicate ride restrictions and accessibility to guests before they arrive and on the day itself.

“We have invited the Brett family to be a part of this review and I look forward to their valuable input.”

“We are proud of the changes we have already made but we know that we can always do more.”

Legoland has said previously in a statement that it “makes every effort” to ensure that its facilities are as accessible as possible. Visitors with specific needs are invited to complete a form about their accessibility needs in advance of their visit in order to receive a ‘Ride Access Pass’.  The resort also publishes an Accessibility Guide with advice for visitors, which is updated annually.

The resort was one of 25 new entries to appear in the latest edition of Rough Guide to Accessible Britain, published earlier this year. The free downloadable guide features advice on the most enjoyable and accessible days out in the UK.

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https://i1.wp.com/thiis.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/Webp.net-resizeimage-11.jpg?fit=900%2C598&ssl=1https://i1.wp.com/thiis.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/Webp.net-resizeimage-11.jpg?resize=150%2C150&ssl=1Liane McIvorNewsroomSector NewsThird Sectoraccessiblity,boy,changes,disabled,Legoland,rides,staff training,steps,wheelchair,WindsorLegoland Windsor has agreed to review its policies after a young boy from was forced to get out of his wheelchair and walk before being allowed on a ride.Seven-year-old Sebby Brett from Gloucestershire has an undiagnosed gross motor delay, similar to cerebral palsy, which has left him unable to...News, views & products for mobility, access and independent living professionals