Trekinetic new amputee specific cushion up and down

Responding to a request from one of its dealers, Trekinetic has created an innovative cushion offering conventional seat cushioning for users wearing prosthetic legs but with crucial limb support for when the user wishes to remove their prosthetic.

The cushion’s discreet design means it looks like a conventional cushion at first glance, however, neatly hidden under the powerchair’s Monocoque seat is a unique folding section.

Wheelchair users wearing prosthetics are able to use the main cushion when riding in their powerchair, however, have the option to unfold an additional section which secures in seconds, providing the support should they wish to remove their prosthetic.

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Discussing the design, Mike said: “Current proprietary solutions are generally either a fixed board support or a conventional cushion. There is a wood board device available, that slides out from under the seat, but of course, the user will be sitting on that.

“Like all good ideas, the final execution of ours looks simple but getting there wasn’t!”

Suggesting that this level of cushioning, security and simplicity is an industry first, Trekinetic’s Managing Director Mike Spindle told THIIS that the company was made aware by a retail partner of a clear need to offer additional support for “a market that is not fully catered for.”

Discussing the decision to create the innovative cushion, Mike told THIIS: “Trekinetic has a policy, of using our innovative resources to accommodate potential customers requirements, despite the challenge. As with most good ideas, this request came via a dealer (Beyond the Boundary Wheelchairs), where a prospective customer needed this solution.

“We find that many customers are left to their own devices because frequently nothing meets their needs. Trekinetic feels that developing a solution for one customer, is always a good long-term investment, as the option will be taken up by others. Despite offering what we feel is the ultimate wheelchair, we plough tens of thousands of pounds a year into research, with more projects just like this in development.”

Confirming that the new cushion can be retro-fitted to all Trekinetic models, the company says there are no detachable items, with all other features remaining intact.

Originally coming from the fast-paced world of Formula One, Mike Spindle turned his engineering expertise to the world of mobility in 2006, aiming to reinvent the powerchair. Appearing in THIIS’ More About feature in March 2018, Mike discussed the launch of the Mk II version of its ultralight GTE powerchair.

Recently the Royal Academy of Engineering commissioned an investigation into how Trekinetic has changed the way wheelchairs are designed and perform.

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https://i0.wp.com/thiis.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/trekinetic-new-cushion.jpg?fit=1000%2C768&ssl=1https://i0.wp.com/thiis.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/trekinetic-new-cushion.jpg?resize=150%2C150&ssl=1Calvin BarnettNewsroomSupplier Newsamputee,Beyond the Boundary Wheelchairs,cushion,dealers,GTE,Mike Spindle,prosthetics,The Royal Academy of Engineering,Trekinetic,wheelchair seatingResponding to a request from one of its dealers, Trekinetic has created an innovative cushion offering conventional seat cushioning for users wearing prosthetic legs but with crucial limb support for when the user wishes to remove their prosthetic. The cushion’s discreet design means it looks like a conventional cushion at...News, views & products for mobility, access and independent living professionals