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The LGA is calling for more accessible and adaptable housing

The Local Government Association is supporting calls to raise the minimum accessibility standards in response to a recent survey revealing the problems fuelling the accessible housing shortage.

It comes in the wake of the Centre for Ageing Better’s released survey results which underlined the urgent need for more accessible housing and the barriers preventing it.

From the 32 local authorities that responded to the survey, a substantial number of respondents highlighted problems with housing developers. 79 per cent stated disputes over viability was a key factor.

With the ageing population on the rise, the Centre for Ageing Better has urged the Government to raise the minimum accessibility standards for new homes, helping avert a looming crisis.

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In response to the findings, the LGA – an association representing 335 councils in England – has backed the organisation’s call for change.

Councillor David Renard, the Local Government Association’s housing spokesperson, said: “These findings reinforce why it is essential that accessible and adaptable housing for older and disabled people is a key part of our national ambition to build new homes, and we support calls to raise the minimum accessibility standards for new housing.

“Good housing is a major contributor to good health and care. Accessible and adaptable homes can keep people safe and independent in their own homes for longer, and prevent avoidable hospital and care home admissions.

“However, our ageing population means more people aged 65 and over are becoming a growing part of our housing market, living in a third of all homes, often unsuitable for their needs.”

In particular, the LGA has called for the government to work with councils, developers and housing associations to provide a “sustainable funding framework”. This would give stakeholders the confidence to invest in the future development of housing for people with a range of needs, argues the Association.

“It should also use the Spending Review to give councils the powers and resources to get back to building the homes the country needs, with a new generation of 100,000 social homes for rent each year,” finished David.

The LGA’s response adds to the growing list of influential organisations campaigning to ensure new homes are future-proofed for the rapidly expanding population of elderly and disabled people. Earlier in the month, a coalition of 10 leading third sector bodies – including Habinteg, Age UK, RIBA and more – urged the public to back their cause.

It follows the September launch of the government’s consultation to consider how best to raise accessibility standards new homes. Among the options are proposals to make it mandatory for all new homes to be built to the mandatory base for accessibility and adaptability, as set out in Building Regulations M4 Category 2.

 

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https://i1.wp.com/thiis.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/housing-conference.jpg?fit=900%2C552&ssl=1https://i1.wp.com/thiis.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/housing-conference.jpg?resize=150%2C150&ssl=1Liane McIvorGovernment & Local AuthoritiesHousingNewsroomReports & ResearchSector NewsAccessibility,adaptable,ageing,homes,housing,independent,need,powers,resources,safe,standardsThe Local Government Association is supporting calls to raise the minimum accessibility standards in response to a recent survey revealing the problems fuelling the accessible housing shortage.It comes in the wake of the Centre for Ageing Better’s released survey results which underlined the urgent need for more accessible housing...News, views & products for mobility, access and independent living professionals