Mobility scootersafety woman riding mobility scooter

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) is encouraging drivers of vehicles including class 3 mobility scooters used on the road to take the ‘number plate test’ to determine if they meet the minimum eyesight standards for driving.

By law, all road users should be able to read a number plate from 20 metres, with the rule also applying to drivers using class 3 mobility scooters on roads.

For class 3 mobility scooter users wishing to exceed more than 4mph, scooters must be used on the road and are legally required to be registered with the DVLA for road use.

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In addition, class 3 mobility scooters are prohibited from travelling faster than 8mph and must have front and rear lights and reflectors, an effective braking system, an audible horn, direction indicators that can operate as a hazard warning signal, as well as a rear-view mirror.

Running throughout the summer, the DVLA’s campaign aims to remind the public that they can easily check their eyesight by taking the 20 metres license plate test and is highlighting easy ways to quickly identify 20 metres at the roadside.

According to the Agency, a relatively accurate and simple rule of thumb for identifying 20 metres without having to reach for a tape measure is five car lengths or eight parking bays

The purpose of the campaign is to reinforce the importance of having good eyesight for driving safely on the roads says the DVLA and comes amid a rise in the number of mobility scooter accidents, with some in the industry calling for a formal assessment process relating to the use of mobility scooters.

Currently, many initiatives are taking place in the mobility industry to address scooter safety, including safety awareness days, training courses and new technology, however, some have highlighted that not all retailers are offering assessments to customers, with a particular focus on online purchasing of powered mobility devices.

Dr Wyn Parry, DVLA’s Senior Doctor, said: “The number plate test is a simple and effective way for people to check their eyesight meets the required standards for driving. The easiest and quickest way to do this is to work out what 20 metres looks like at the roadside and then test yourself on whether you can clearly read the number plate. It’s an easy check to perform any time of day at the roadside and takes just a couple of seconds.

“Having good eyesight is essential for safe driving, so it’s really important for drivers to have regular eye tests. Eyesight can naturally deteriorate over time so anyone concerned about their eyesight should visit their optician – don’t wait for your next check-up.”

With mobility scooter users often being the elderly and vulnerable and the most likely for their eyesight to naturally deteriorate, there is currently no compulsory requirement in place for mobility dealers to ensure customers meet the ‘number plate test’ conditions, with the level of assessment provided being the choice of the retailer.

Recently, five industry professionals came together to share their thoughts regarding if the mobility industry needs to introduce formal qualifications for the sale of medical devices that are widely considered as needing some form of assessment, such as mobility scooters and powerchairs.

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https://i1.wp.com/thiis.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/scooter-safety-3.jpg?fit=1000%2C667&ssl=1https://i1.wp.com/thiis.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/scooter-safety-3.jpg?resize=150%2C150&ssl=1Calvin BarnettGovernment & LegislationNewsroomRetailer Newsclass 3,Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency,DVLA,eye test,eyesight,Mobility scooters,national campaign,number plate test,scooter safety,trade thoughtsThe Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) is encouraging drivers of vehicles including class 3 mobility scooters used on the road to take the ‘number plate test’ to determine if they meet the minimum eyesight standards for driving. By law, all road users should be able to read a number...News, views & products for mobility, access and independent living professionals