Houses of Parliament Brexit

After the Commons voted 330 to 231 in favour of the government’s Withdrawal Agreement Bill, the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) has confirmed that all no-deal Brexit planning has been stood down with immediate effect.

The passing of the Withdrawal Agreement Bill means the UK is likely to leave the EU on the 31st January 2020, with the 11-month transition coming into effect whereby the UK will no longer be recognised as an EU member but will still be required to align to existing regulatory and customs procedures.

During the transition period, set to end on the 31st December 2020, the UK and EU will negotiate to agree on the future relationship across a range of topics, including the future trading relationship.

Advertisement | Continue story below

It comes following the Conservative’s landslide victory in the December 2019 general election, enabling Prime Minister Boris Johnson to command a substantial majority in parliament.

The passing of the Bill also marks the end of no-deal Brexit planning for the 31st January, with the Department of Health and Social Care informing the healthcare industry that NHS Supply Chain has started to destock following a build-up of resources to help cushion any disruption caused by a no-deal exit.

According to the DHSC, the Centralised Stock Build will be managed down over the next four months and this activity, including related engagement with industry from NHS Supply Chain, has already begun.

Importantly for suppliers of medical devices to the NHS, this managed destocking of resources does not mean that the NHS will cease ordering from suppliers over the period. Instead, NHS Supply Chain will be taking 50 percent of demand requirements from stock and 50 percent from suppliers until stock is at normal inventory levels.

Additionally, the National Supply Disruption Response (NSDR) function has been stood down.

Over the next week, the DHSC says it will contact suppliers to inform them of the change and will repeat its supplier engagement again in February, as well as informing organisations that any supply issues or shortages should be reported through business as usual channels.

Andrew Stevenson, interim Director General of the British Healthcare Trades Association, commented: “The BHTA welcomes the end of the period of no-deal uncertainty, enabling our members to look ahead to the future, invest and plan accordingly.

“As the government enters the next stages of negotiations with the European Union to agree the future relationship and trade deal during the 11-month transition period, we will ensure to keep our members abreast of all changes and developments whilst ensuring the needs and concerns of the sector are heard throughout the process.”

https://i2.wp.com/thiis.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/Houses-of-Parliament.jpg?fit=900%2C534&ssl=1https://i2.wp.com/thiis.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/Houses-of-Parliament.jpg?resize=150%2C150&ssl=1Calvin BarnettGovernment & LegislationNewsroomNHSSector NewsAndrew Stevenson,BHTS,Brexit,British Healthcare Trades Association,Commons,Department of Health and Social Care,Director-General,EU,European Union,Houses of Parliament,NHS,NHS Supply Chain,no-deal,Trade DealAfter the Commons voted 330 to 231 in favour of the government’s Withdrawal Agreement Bill, the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) has confirmed that all no-deal Brexit planning has been stood down with immediate effect. The passing of the Withdrawal Agreement Bill means the UK is likely to...News, views & products for mobility, access and independent living professionals