Elderly woman at home washing up
Age UK has found over 200,000 older people, many with mobility needs, have had their social care support reduced due to COVID-19 and is calling on the government to provide additional funding.

Since the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic, 210,000 people over the age of 65  – one in seven of those receiving care before the pandemic – have seen a reduction in the care they have received, according to new Age UK estimates.

Of the 13 per cent of the population in England aged over 65 who were receiving care before the pandemic began, eight per cent are receiving less care and seven per cent are no longer receiving any care.

The figures were collected in June and July this year by Age UK, the nationwide charity which provides services and support for older people.

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Retailers in the mobility and access trade are also likely to see an increased demand for mobility and access products after another poll by Age UK revealed that the pandemic has led to more older people needing help with the ‘activities of daily living’.

For many, ordinary activities, such as going upstairs or washing, have therefore become difficult, and previously independent older people have become reliant on walking aids to move short distances, which they used to manage with ease.

Its poll revealed that 33 per cent of older people who were already struggling to get up and down the stairs say this is now more difficult. Of the 39 per cent who were already finding it hard to walk short distances outside now say this is now more difficult.

The poll also found that 40 per cent of people who already found it difficult to shower, wash, or have a bath, say this is now much more difficult, and that of the 43 per cent who had been finding it hard to clean/tidy their house say this is now more difficult.

It seems that, as medical experts predicted would occur, being shut away at home for long periods during this health emergency has left significant numbers of older people with reduced mobility and experiencing deconditioning – a loss of physical capacity due to muscle weakness, as well as joint pain. (Here is a link to internal story to back up the claim:  and also to keep readers on the website longer and visiting more pages.

Age UK found that among older people there is a strong relationship between having significant long term health problems, like heart disease and diabetes, and developing a need for care.

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https://i2.wp.com/thiis.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/elderly-woman-at-home-washing-up-e1606214986691.jpg?fit=900%2C600&ssl=1https://i2.wp.com/thiis.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/elderly-woman-at-home-washing-up-e1606214986691.jpg?resize=150%2C150&ssl=1Liane McIvorNewsroomReports & ResearchSector NewsThird SectorUncategorisedaccess,activities,Age,care,daily,difficult,living,Mobility,needs,pandemic,pollAge UK has found over 200,000 older people, many with mobility needs, have had their social care support reduced due to COVID-19 and is calling on the government to provide additional funding. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic, 210,000 people over the age of 65  - one in seven...News, views & products for mobility, access and independent living professionals